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Hi.

Prepare your anus, you’re about to get a red pill suppository.

Degeneracy as Disease

Degeneracy as Disease

Everything that could insult societies’ and nations’ integrity and requirements for continuity should be regarded as degeneracy. Problems in children’s growing environments is degeneracy because the child wouldn’t develop into a useful member of the society. Homosexuality is degeneracy because it won’t lead to offspring, and therefore does not better society’s continuity. Pedophilia hurts children and has nothing to do with starting a family, and for this reason is also degenerate. Usually degeneracy centers on sexuality and its perversions. Healthy sexuality strengthens the relationship and creates life. Distorted sexuality (eg-anal sex) doesn’t create life and brings pain and death in the form of anal abrasions and AIDS.

At its core, degeneracy isn’t a moral concept. Although one can say that degeneracy is wrong or immoral, that doesn’t capture its essence. Degeneracy derives its moral tint from the threatening of existence. Everything stems from existence and we formulate our moral systems based on it. Practically, degeneracy is a medical problem, not a moral one. No one says to a cancer patient that he did something wrong or immoral. He ought not to be imprisoned because he fell ill.  In the same vein, no one says to him that it’s just a normal phenomenon of aging. You want to get rid of cancer and it is regarded as an unwanted and lethal illness. It’s not a moral problem, it’s a problem of existence. Cancer destroys the system, ie-in our context a person’s integrity and their prospects for genetic continuity.

Where humans are formed of cells, tissues and organs, so, too, is a nation formed from individuals, families and institutions. Cells differ and they are specialized to perform a specific function; every specialized cell is essential for healthy existence. Every society has individuals that differ from each other, even within a race and smaller sects. That’s a fact of complex existence. They differ in talents, temperament, et cetera. Inevitably, though, different types find their place in a society in a way that facilitates society’s prospects for continuity. Whereas neurons process information, liver cells control the energy distributions, leukocytes/ lymph cells eliminates pathogens like bacteria and viruses, fibrocytes maintain the body structure et cetera, in a healthy society there are cognitive people who organize the institutions and plan infrastructure, and there are do’ers who build and maintain that infrastructure; there are conservative types who maintain the status quo and there are open-minded critics who evaluate and critique the system (society/culture); there are liberals or revolutionaries who catalyze change and conscientious and justice-oriented people who takes care of physical and spiritual cleanliness; and so on.

The evolution of complex systems, such as in animal hierarchies or in human societies, proceeds in a way where everything that isn’t essential for the system’s continuity is eventually discarded. Let us consider cholesterol. Cholesterol is an important molecule found in the cellular membrane of eukaryotic cells. The synthesis of cholesterol is a complicated process and it is energetically costly. The synthesis involves over twenty steps and well over twenty different enzymes. Therefore there are plenty that could go wrong in the pathway of the synthesis. It seems fair to state that, as processes become more complex, they become inherently more fragile. If cholesterol wasn’t essential, it would be discarded along with the machinery that facilitates the synthesis as soon as something goes wrong with it. It would be discarded, because the individuals who doesn’t synthesize it would have more resources at their disposal than the ones that do. And therefore they’d have evolutionary advantage. But cholesterol is synthesized in the system, so wouldn’t it be fair to assume that it is essential for health, despite the costs and inherent vulnerabilities?

The way of thinking about health and the existence of complex entities is sensible to apply to societies and degeneracy. Far from a perfect analogy, there are striking similarities between organisms and societies. We don’t know that much about cholesterol and it’s to this day a hot topic for research. But we can honestly make the assumption that it is an essential molecule. We can assume that traditional gender roles, sanctity of children, marriage, family, rule of law et cetera are essential for society’s continued healthy existence. Everything that is detrimental to those institutions is degeneracy. Maintaining them is costly, but inherently vulnerable: still they persist, and persist they must.

Bain & Gain

Bain & Gain

Why the Mannerbund

Why the Mannerbund